From Africa to the Balkans - the migration of the Egyptian Vultures tagged with satellite transmitters

03.04.2018
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The migration route of Aoos

Again, we look at the last four surviving Egyptian vultures tagged with satellite transmitters. We tracked down the route on the map and with relief we found out that two of them have already reached their breeding grounds on the Balkans:

Boris was the champion among them, covering the distance between his wintering ground in Afar, Ethiopia and his breeding ground in Bulgaria for only 20 days. Boris is an adult male Egyptian vulture from the Eastern Rhodopes tagged with a satellite transmitter in the summer of 2015.

Jenny is the adult female Egyptian vulture, tagged with a satellite transmitter in 2015, along with Boris. After spending the winter in central Chad, on March 4, Jenny started her migration to Bulgaria. Only two days ago she reached her breeding grounds in the Eastern Rhodopes.

Aoos - the other female adult Egyptian vulture that was tagged with a satellite transmitter in 2015, just like Jenny, spent the winter in Chad, in almost the same area. Both birds began their migration on March 4, and Aos is just a few hundred kilometers from her breeding territory in Albania. The migration of both female vultures  took about a month and covered more than 4500 km.

However not everybody is on a hurry. Iliaz - the only survivor from the nine juveniles tagged in 2012, just became a mature bird and is not on a rush. Two weeks ago he started his migration from the south of Chad and he is now in Egypt making his way north calm and slowly. We keep our fingers crossed for him to find a mate in the breeding grounds in the Balkans.

The migration route of Iliaz
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